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the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller
on. it is a very interesting piece of technology. there is no battery, no radio, no antenna. if you ever thought about how you might pass something inside the body, for example, i do not know if you have ever heard of anything called a potato battery. that is where you put a little bit of copper, magnesium inside a potato and then you can like it up. in this case, we have a little bit of copper, a little bit of magnesium, both essential battery elements. we have about 7 micrograms of copper. and you need about 1,500 milligrams of copper per day, in your diet. and then a tiny bit of magnesium. when you swallow this device, you become the potato. it is powered by you. and it sends a unique identifier through your body that can only be protected -- and detected by the thing that is on your body, the patch. the pill will say, hello, i am here. i am novartis. and i am 5 milligrams. i am-no. 12 and tell no. 2. that is the data that we collect. >> how you get that into this? >> it is a digital platform. essentially, the way it works is when you swallow it and turn it on, it will send a sig
that we have read, that technology and the enhanced use of auto maition and technology have been a recurring theme for the department of building and inspection and i didn't see any emphasis and there was no mention of that in terms of the budget or at least not with any emphasis, i also note having red last year's grand jury report that the city has a very, very poor track record of implementing technology and yet, it seems to have been established that you know, hand held devices in the field, and better coordination of records from different departments that there are a wide variety of ways that technology could improve the efficiency of the staff, and the customer service, if you will. so i wondered, where that is in the budget, and what safe guards that the technology could be properly implemented. >> thank you. >> hi, again, robert, i was just wondering about the comments of the open notices of violation. and my question is how are the down stream effects not relevant? the permits that are applied for the inspection fees, the reinspection fees? i mean, if you look at the ja
? >> guest: when you swallow it, it turns on. now, this is a very interesting piece of technology. there's no battery, there's no radio, this is no antenna. if you ever thought about how you might, for example, power something inside the body, i don't know if you have ever made something called a potato battery, so, it's a device where you put a little bit of copper, a little magnesium in a copper, and you discover to your child's delight that you can light a diode. well, in this case we have of a little bit of copper and magnesium, both essential dietary elements. we have about seven micrograms of copper. you need about 1500 milliyams of cop -- milligrams a day in your diet. so it's a tiny fraction of your rda in the magnesium. when you swallow this device, you become the potato, and you turn it on. so it's powered by you, and it sends a unique identifier through your body that can only be detected by the thing that's on your body, the patch. so the pill is going to say, hello, i'm here, i'm novartis, i'm five milligrams, i'm batch number 12, and i'm pill number two. that's the data we
. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and get to know you because i am sure there's an interesting story that you will really enjoy hearing from her. you have a
, technology tv and the policy issues that accompany them. >> host: so, gary shapiro give us a snapshot of ces international 2013. >> guest: this event has been phenomenal. we've had more companies and more spaces, more innovation and more excitement than ever i can recall. you know in these tough economic times it's nice of to have some positive news, and there's a lot out there from all sorts of companies. the big ones like intel and qualcomm and samsung, and the smallest one. we have this area of the show for start-ups with 150 companies with ideas and some people are coming back from there and saying these are really breakthrough technologies, these are great. but it's just the american way you know? you have this ability of anyone to come up with an idea and expose it, and that's why we run this event. it's for anyone. it's not just for -- the big companies actually respect that we have the small companies here, and that's how we run this organization. >> host: where do you see growth in consumer electronics in the next couple of years? >> guest: ing there's growth in several categories.
of reports on our lack of technology to sit in on the group. >> it might be worth while to let them know. >> good. >> okay. >> actually, additional state quarter meetings are going to be held subsequently and they will be involved in the testing and review and feedback of the citizen portal so that is going to occur. do you have any questions on this subject? >> good job. >> okay. >> keep it moving. >> yeah. this is going to go ahead and talk about the technology project. >> yeah. >> so the several of them that are critical but the most critical one is the infrastructure refresh which is the improvement. the proposal was submitted two years ago to the college, which of the committee and information technology to revamp our service this is about 7 years old. and we started this process two years ago, the city export and the city on committee of technology over sees the technology projects in the city and they do and were pushing for consolidation, as a result of that, actually, we were approved to go ahead and do the refresh of the infrastructure in conjunction with the planning departmen
people are coming back and saying this is a really breakthrough technology and these are great but it's just the american way. you have the ability of anyone to come up with an idea and expose it. that is why we have this event. the big companies respect that we have the small companies there and that is how we run this organization. >> host: where do you see growth in consumer electronics in the next couple of years? >> guest: there are growth in several categories. sometimes categories go through a lull and the rise. we had the video area that went through a lull but it's getting back with connected to be in very thin tv so that's exciting. other areas of standing wireless. the fcc changed -- chairman made a huge announcement. that's only for wifi but all sorts of products that you can envision and the first-grade product they came from unlicensed spectrum garage door opener and accord cordless phone and baby monitor. these were things no one anticipated. it's getting pretty crowded here especially at airports and it's tough to see your wifi so that's great. biometric sensing clearl
this is the technology -- the technology of this is so -- even the rise of drones has such a sci-fi kind of vibe to it. there's always that sense whenever the united states makes a sort of jump in kind of warfare we celebrate it and realize seven going to have one of these in five years sox that the general consensus of those working on this type of technology. >> you could do on a web site to do it yourself drones and build it yourself. >> jon: i would not tell that to me. [ laughter ] it's actually like a home project? >> or if you go to brookstone or amazon and buy one online. >> jon: with a hell-fire sniffle. >> not quite those are a little bit more. >> jon: the technology is simple. >> we call them unmanned aerial vehicles because the word drone takes on a stupidness. they are getting smarter. they are sim aircraft. that's one of reasons they are so popular because they are cheaper to build and a lot cheaper to fly and maintain. you don't need an expensive pilot that costs millions to train. >> jon: doesn't take away any advantage that the united states has. if we have advantage it's that we like
basics, stay with me. >> let's talk about the technology, what is it and how does it work? there are three types of solar actually when you sauk about solar. i want to avoid the confusion to make sure we're focusing on the right one. two of them involve heating water and they're very viable technologies, can be very coast effective but we're not going to deal with them right now. one is solar pool heating. it pumps the water up there, heats it, runs it through there, the sun heats it and back into the pool. this one is called solar thermal or solar hot water. it heats domestic hot water or d.h.w. that's your hot water that you use four showers and dishwashers. we're going to talk about solar electric. they have the same technology as computer chips. they're similar in structure to that tran cystor-like computer chip technology based on silicon. the best thing about them is there are no moving parts and they last a long time. there are cells, modules, and arrays. a cell is one of these pieces here. it's a small unit wired together in a certain way to produce half a volt. th
technology that most people have in their pockets. antoniades: inside this cell phone we find a tiny little camera. so if you were to take off the majority of it you'd be left with an imaging chip. if you were to take 368 of these and make a big mosaic out of them and start shooting images now you have argus. narrator: unlike the predator camera that limits field of view, argus melds together video from each of its 368 chips to create a 1.8 billion pixel video stream. this makes it possible to zoom in and still see tremendous detail. whether argus has been deployed in the field is classified. antoniades: i'm not at liberty to discuss plans with the government. but if we had our choice we would like argus to be over the same area 24 hours a day seven days a week. that's not very easily achievable with manned platforms. this is where uavs come in and they're absolutely the perfect platform. narrator: argus may be mounted on an armed uav like the predator, a long-range platform like the giant global hawk or a development craft called the solar eagle that may someday st
: the realities include a more technologically oriented military, but still the requirements for special operations, special forces, infantry. in your judgment and commander as a leader of tens of thousands , do you believe that women will have soon of role in such elements of our army and other branches? >> i believe this policy is the way -- and as the chairman and the sec staff laid out, that there is an assessment phase and a revision of the current military operation specialties with every visit. the standards, the requirements for each one of those military operational specialties. and by doing so they will ensure that those women and men who are applying for those particular specialties will meet those qualifications. so they have the desire and the qualification without compromising those standards. lou: many people in this argument debate and hopefully just plain old discussion have sided with the israelis, men and women serving shoulder to shoulder and really every role in their military. can you think of a reason why it should not be so in the united states military? >> no, i
? is there a bubble? >> i would like to speak about the clean technology sector. there was a little bit of a bubble that emerged in 2005, 2006, 2007 time frame. what has happened since then is you see the landscape changed. there have been a lot of companies and vc's, founders, that are focused on very few investments in companies but are in it for the long run. the time and invested it takes to build a clean tech company. the difference with clean tech, there might be large facilities required, investment to build your first plant, for instance. we are seeing a change in the landscape. one thing i want to add, too, for clean tech, there are organizations like the clean tech opened that foster innovation and identify and help on to produce with that system, present their idea, put together their business plan, attract the mentors and advisers to help them build their technology. the incubators are contributing to a maturing clean tech and biotech sector -- sector. >> just a short comment. we focus in this building, a research center, on technology. some of it is near term, some of it is very long t
sectors under the president has been technology. second only to consumer discretionaries. the tech sector up more than 100% over the past four years. and 13 days of trading into 2013, the tech sector continuing its gains of just under 2% and this week is a big week for tech earnings, everyone. coming up, we will break down the most important things you need to know about the big reports. and are you better off than you were four years ago? well, at least your 401(k) might be. how do you make sure that your portfolio has returns? like all of this, we have a guy that can help you. the multistrategy income fund is outperforming 99% of its peers. it is up 24% year over year. angel oak cofounder and chief investment officer will be joining me during this hour to tell you why he is going big on real estate. plus, we've seen the beginnings of a rebound in the housing recovery, but is washington's best investment the white house? all right, i'm going to tell you what its value. president obama is officially sworn in for his second term and using the opportunity to call for unity in washington. pe
a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show u
travel alongside a plant. using this new technology, it became has possible to condense the arrival of spring in a woodland into a few seconds. but the wonderful thing about wildlife filmmaking is that, no matter how much you've seen and filmed there's always going to be something to surprise you. i remember back in 1994, we were filming nepenthes rajah, the largest pitcher plant in the world growing up in the mountains of borneo. and i made an assumption about how it obtained its nitrogen fertilizer. i guess this one contains, oh, two or three pints of liquid. it's so big that it catches not just insects but even small rodents. and one was recorded that had in it the body of a drowned rat. so if ever there was a carnivore among plants this is it. but i was wrong. in 2010, scientists discovered that the plant gets its nitrogen in a quite different way and we couldn't resist going back to see if we could find out what the truth was. mount kinabalu in sabah is home to many rajah pitcher plants. they certainly seem to attract insects that fall into
technology sector. supervisor farrell mention the city as a partner in the effort.one of the commitments it was unheard of by many of the tech companies, the same with tax exclusion that we also did on stock compensation was that tech companies were committed on working with the city of san francisco on hiring residents from many neighborhoods that don't have access to the growing technology sector whether it is the mission, tenderloin, south of market and western addition; and happy to have cosponsors breed, cohen, avalos - to see what it is that we can do to partner with our private tech sector to ensure that we are opening up and creating a pipeline of jobs whether it is for our students born and raised in san francisco who might not get the type of education to be competitive for these jobs; whether it is adults that i found themselves unemployed in an economy not doing well but need additional training for these jobs. what is it that we can do to partner with the mayor's office in our tech companies to develop programs that would address three different population needs so they
in the workplace. "we're trying to give the robots more human attributes and also add sensor technology." a lot of this is dedicated to heavy-industry. the plexi-glass safety wall used in this display is often common in the workplace to prevent injury. but now, more robots are being developed for the workplace, with people standing right next to them. "it hits me and this message pops up on the screen." "it means that you can have the robot working side-by-side with someone and there won't be a need for any safety walls around the robot." since 2008, universal robot, a danish company, has installed 1500 robots in nearly 50 countries including china. but the chinese are not likely to outsource repetitive electronics work at factories such as foxconn - at least, not yet. "in my eyes, it's not quite there yet." another development, visual capabilities: the r&d that went into smartphone technology is now being applied to robots. "vision technology is continuing to increase. they can see color and identify damaged packages." advancing technology in the workplace has also magnified the job shortage i
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
more technology in his hand than we have for medicare fraud. what we're having here is a disaster of epic, calamitous proportions, thank you very much, because we could be saving 120, 150 billion, with a b, if we followed fraud the way they do at the private sector. private sector, fraud is about 1% of medical plans. in medicare, medicaid and the federal system up to 10 or 12%, they don't know, know way to measure it. this is the classic example where we have 1990's technology could save this money and the government is twiddling their thumbs. >> caroline, this is a drop in the bucket of the whole medicare annual budget, but you've got to start somewhere, don't you? >> i would agree, but toby, we did just put in a 77 million dollar system and that's why we caught this. this is a new type of fraud. so i'm a little more optimistic and i want to complicate it a little bit because when you're talking undocumented workers, we actually make $80,000 on average per worker because two-thirds of the 12 million undocumented workers, 8 million of them pay medicare, social security, and they p
dream story of the convention, technology is changing the way america is going to look to the future. gerri: let's talk more about that because what is happening at the end of the day, regular families are making a mint on this. people are getting wealthy, changing the fortunes not just of governments, but of individual families. is that you found? >> yes. i think it was an under reported aspect of the last election. the reason president obama did so well in ohio and pennsylvania is because their is a fossil fuel boom in the state's. people are doing well. there is a feel-good factor. they go for the incumbent. there is definitely that aspect. it has brought tremendous prosperity. and i suppose money is not everything. if it was polluting the water or making the water go, it would not be worth it, but it's not. in the sun just me saying that. lisa jackson told congress twice under oath that she has never seen one example of fracking polluting water anywhere in america command has been going on for 16 years. so no more scary stories. the science is settled in this. it is not settled.
, it takes technology to demonstrate how dangerous technology can be. ryan harper got into the simulator to learn about texting while driving. >> its by the grace of god i haven't been an nan accident. >> at and t is spending millions of dollars that it can wait. >> just going chaempk your think something. >> for sure. i zront a car here in san jose. but yes. when i go home, i will not be texting and driving. >> are you just saying is that that? >> i promise. i'm a changed man. >> police were on hand to let students know their planning 42 enforcement events to nab distracted drivers. whether texting or talking on a phone, issuing 123 citations last year. >> i think it's difficult for people to break the hab yismt we get more comfortable with the technology we have. and we have a quick phone call for information. >> at and t has an app sending a reply you'll text back when it is time to do so. to under score texting is a two way process, texting while driving can have fatal consequence autos having a patrol officer write nay report that a text was sent at 12:05 is the reason she is dead i
an acceptable rate of unemployment is. unfortunately, with technology changing, there are going to be more unemployed people. the question is, there are jobs available too. how do we mesh those together? > all right, jobs: where is the hiring taking place? > > the old stalwarts are always going to be there. you have healthcare, you have education. the key is, people don't know what that means. do i need to be a nurse, do i need to be a doctor, do i need to be a teacher? but the answer really is, if you are in customer service in healthcare, can you do data analysis in healthcare? can you do technology for the software programs that are in healthcare? a lot of it is the population going out and getting retrained in order to take the jobs that are needed. > so technology, that mantra is you really have to be training yourself for the jobs of the day. they're not around anymore, the kind of jobs that used to be. > > it's a different world. everything is different, right? styles change, jobs change. the problem is, if you have been doing the same thing for 20 years, 15 years, 30 years, and you
? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> all right. i want apple higher. my charitable trust owns it. they've got to do a deal, big buyback, huge boost in the dividend. they've got to make that cash hoard work for you if you're a shareholder, and then it's fine. it's not fablulous, but it's fine. i'm jim cramer and i will see you tomorrow. >>> good evening. i'm larry kudlow. this is the kudlow report. you know we learned today in this solid bull market apple doesn't run the market. even with its crash the dow managed to rise and the s&p 500 was flat. this by itself was very bullish and is part of our still bullish theme here. there was drama in washington, d.c. also, senator diane feinstein declares a goal to dry up the supply of weapons over time. she wants to immediately ban 150 types. she may as well ban the second amendment while she's at it because this is an outrageous over the top stuff. i don't believe it. i'm kudlow. this is the kudlow report and we begin right now. >> first up, old time market highs in sight. the dow iing cl
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
is the technology expert at barrango corporation of south san francisco, california, a preeminent player in the $2 billion-a-year visual merchandising business. >> we create props, decorations, displays for stores, shopping malls, amusement parks, any commercial properties. >> reporter: this all started right after the san francisco earthquake. a newly-arrived italian immigrant named barrango, a sculptor by trade, started making mannequins, the most lifelike anyone had ever seen. but it turns out the real gold was in holiday displays, and, for over 100 years, barrango has been manufacturing them and classic carosels for retailers around the country and the world, from boston to burbank, from berlin to beijing. yes, they ship to china, but they don't make it there. >> we've had the opportunity to go to china and have things manufactured, but we're a quality, hands-on family, company, and we need it to be in america in order to produce what we've got. we can't just turn it over to production in another country. >> reporter: it is that quality- first mantra, along with its global reach, that squired
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,207 (some duplicates have been removed)

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